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Courtesies




In the Marine Corps, Air Force, and the first couple weeks of Coast Guard basic training, instructors are also addressed as sir or ma'am. Don't overuse these terms, though. In other words, don't say something like, "Sir, I have to go to the bathroom, sir.

If you're attending Army or Navy basic training, do not address your training instructor as sir or ma'am. This is guaranteed to result in a loud tirade abouthow they work for a living. Some historians believe the hand salute began in late Roman times when assassinations were common.

A citizen who wanted to see a public official had to approach with his right hand raised to show that he did not hold a weapon. Knights in armor raised visors with the right hand when meeting a comrade.

This practice gradually became a way of showing respect, and, in early American history, sometimes involved removing the hat. By , the motion was modified to touching the hat, and since then, it has become the hand salute used today. You salute to show respect toward an officer, the flag, or your country. In the Army and Navy, drill instructors are addressed by using their military rank and often their last name — for example, Chief or Staff Sergeant Smith.

In Marine Corps basic training, do not use personal pronouns such as "you," "I," or "we. Instead, speak in the third person: The salute isn't simply an honor exchanged; it's a privileged gesture of respect and trust among military members. The salute is not only prescribed by regulation, but is also recognition of each other's commitment, abilities, and professionalism.

The salute is widely misunderstood outside the military. Some consider it to be a gesture of servility since the junior extends a salute to the senior, but this interpretation isn't true at all.

The salute is an expression that recognizes each other as a member of the profession of arms — that they have made a personal commitment of self-sacrifice to preserve the American way of life.

The fact that the junior extends the greeting first is merely a point of etiquette — a salute extended or returned makes the same statement. The way you salute says a lot about you as a military member. A proud, smart salute shows pride in yourself and your unit and that you're confident in your abilities as a soldier. A sloppy salute can mean that you're ashamed of your unit, lack confidence, or, at the very least, haven't learned how to salutecorrectly.

You'll get plenty of practice saluting in basic training, but it wouldn't hurt to practice in front of a mirror several times before you leave so that you can doit correctly automatically. All military enlisted personnel in uniform are required to salute when they meet and recognize a commissioned or warrant officer, except when it is inappropriate or impractical for example, if you're carrying something using both hands. A salute is also rendered. Military courtesy shows respect and reflects self-discipline.

While some of these courtesies seem to wane after basic, they're strictly adhered to during military basic training:. Military courtesy is not a one-way street. Enlisted personnel are expected to be courteous to officers and likewise officers are expected to return the courtesy. Mutual respect is a vital part of military courtesy.

In the final analysis, military courtesy is the respect shown to each other by members of the same profession. Some of the Army's more common courtesies include rendering the hand salute, standing at attention or parade rest, or even addressing others by their rank.

The salute is not simply an honor exchanged. It is a privileged gesture of respect and trust among soldiers. Remember the salute is not only prescribed by regulation but is also recognition of each other's commitment, abilities, and professionalism. Some historians believe the hand salute began in late Roman times when assassinations were common.

A citizen who wanted to see a public official had to approach with his right hand raised to show that he did not hold a weapon. Knights in armor raised visors with the right hand when meeting a comrade. This practice gradually became a way of showing respect and, in early American history, sometimes involved removing the hat. By , the motion was modified to touching the hat, and since then it has become the hand salute used today.

You salute to show respect toward an officer, flag, or our country. The salute is widely misunderstood outside the military. Some consider it to be a gesture of servility since the junior extends a salute to the senior, but we know that it is quite the opposite. The salute is an expression that recognizes each other as a member of the profession of arms; that they have made a personal commitment of self-sacrifice to preserve our way of life.

The fact that the junior extends the greeting first is merely a point of etiquette-a salute extended or returned makes the same statement. As they turned the corner and approached the building, PFC Robertson walked out carrying a large box. PFC Robertson said, "Good morning, sir," and kept walking past the two. As his hands were occupied, he didn't salute.

If I had been carrying something and he wasn't, he would have saluted. It's a privilege, not a chore," said 1LT Thompson. The way you salute says a lot about you as a soldier. A proud, smart salute shows pride in yourself and your unit and that you are confident in your abilities as a soldier. A sloppy salute might mean that you're ashamed of your unit, lack confidence, or at the very least, that you haven't learned how to salute correctly.

In saluting, turn your head and eyes toward the person or flag you are saluting. Bring your hand up to the correct position in one, smart motion without any preparatory movement.

When dropping the salute, bring your hand directly down to its natural position at your side, without slapping your leg or moving your hand out to the side.

Any flourish in the salute is improper. The proper way to salute when wearing the beret or without headgear is to raise your right hand until the tip of your forefinger touches the outer edge of your right eyebrow just above and to the right of your right eye.

When wearing headgear, the forefinger touches the headgear slightly above and to the right of your right eye. Your fingers are together, straight, and your thumb snug along the hand in line with the fingers. Your hand, wrist, and forearm are straight, forming a straight line from your elbow to your fingertips.

Your upper arm elbow to shoulder is horizontal to the ground. All soldiers in uniform are required to salute when they meet and recognize persons entitled by grade to a salute except when it is inappropriate or impractical in public conveyances such as planes and buses, in public places such as inside theaters, or when driving a vehicle.

A salute is also rendered: To uncased National Color outdoors. On ceremonial occasions such as changes of command or funerals. At reveille and retreat ceremonies, during the raising or lowering of the flag. During the sounding of honors. When pledging allegiance to the US flag outdoors. When turning over control of formations. To officers of friendly foreign countries.

Salutes are not required when: Indoors, unless reporting to an officer or when on duty as a guard. Saluting is obviously inappropriate. In any case not covered by specific instructions, render the salute. Either the senior or the subordinate is wearing civilian clothes. In general, you don't salute when you are working for example, under your vehicle doing maintenance , indoors except when reporting , or when saluting is not practical carrying articles with both hands, for example.

A good rule of thumb is this: Outdoors includes theater marquees, shelters over gas station pumps, covered walkways, and other similar shelters that are open on the sides.

Military courtesy shows respect and reflects self-discipline. Consistent and proper military courtesy is an indicator of unit discipline, as well. Soldiers demonstrate courtesy in the way we address officers or NCOs of superior rank. Some other simple but visible signs of respect and self-discipline are as follows: When talking to an officer of superior rank, stand at attention until ordered otherwise.

When you are dismissed, or when the officer departs, come to attention and salute. When speaking to or being addressed a noncommissioned officer of superior rank, stand at parade rest until ordered otherwise. When an officer of superior rank enters a room, the first soldier to recognize the officer calls personnel in the room to attention but does not salute. A salute indoors is rendered only when reporting. When entering or exiting a vehicle, the junior ranking soldier is the first to enter, and the senior in rank is the first to exit.

The first person who sees an officer enter a dining facility gives the order "At ease," unless a more senior officer is already present. Many units extend this courtesy to senior NCOs, also. When you hear the command "At ease" in a dining facility, remain seated, silent and continue eating unless directed otherwise.

When you report to an officer of superior rank, approach the officer to whom you are reporting and stop about two steps from him, assuming the position of attention. Give the proper salute and say, for example, "Sir, Private Smith reports. If you are armed, however, do not remove your headgear.

SFC Stone, the platoon sergeant was present to monitor the counseling. PV2 Robbs entered the room and immediately assumed the position of parade rest but before he could report, SGT Putnam said, "You don't have to do that. Standing at parade rest is what junior enlisted soldiers do when speaking with or being addressed by an NCO.

Besides, you know the proper command would be 'at ease,' 'stand at ease,' or 'carry on. This is a great unit to soldier in. A soldier addressing a higher ranking officer uses the word sir or ma'am in the same manner as a polite civilian speaking with a person to whom he wishes to show respect. In the military service, the matter of who says sir or ma'am to whom is clearly defined; in civilian life it is largely a matter of discretion. In the case of NCOs and soldiers, we address them by their rank because they've earned that rank.

Simple courtesy is an important indicator of a person's bearing, discipline, and manners. It is a fact that most people respond positively to genuine politeness and courtesy.

Walk down a street in most towns and cities and see the response you get from people when you just say "good morning. Some units substitute the greeting with their unit motto, such as "Deeds, not Words," or "Keep up the Fire. When I walk up to a soldier he should go to parade rest. Not because I'm better than he is, but because he respects who he is and who I am based on what we both do.

The flag of the United States is the symbol of our nation. The union, white stars on a field of blue, is the honor point of the flag. The union of the flag and the flag itself, when in company with other flags, are always given the honor position, which is on the right. Some of the rules for displaying the flag are as follows: All Army installations will display the flag of the United States outdoors. Installations will display the flag daily from reveille to retreat.

When a number of flags are displayed from staffs set in a line, the flag of the United States will be at the right; to the left of an observer facing the display. If no foreign national flags are present, the flag of the United States may be placed at the center of the line providing it is displayed at a higher level.

When the flag of the United States is displayed with state flags, all of the state flags will be of comparable size.

When the flag is being raised in the morning, you should stand at attention on the first note of "Reveille" and salute. In the evening "Retreat" is played prior to "To the Colors. When you hear the first note of "Retreat" come to the position of attention and face the flag or the direction the music is coming from if the flag is not visible. Render the hand salute at the first note of "To the Colors. At the conclusion of the music, resume your regular duties.

If you are involved in some duty that would be hampered by saluting, you do not need to salute. When in a formation or a group, the senior soldier present will call the group to "Attention" and then "Parade, Rest" at the first note of "Retreat. When in civilian clothing, the only change is to place your right hand over your heart instead of saluting. Vehicles in motion should stop. If you are in a car or on a motorcycle, dismount and salute.

If you are with a group in a military vehicle or bus, remain in the vehicle. The individual in charge will dismount and salute. These honors also apply to the national anthems of foreign countries during ceremonies or parades. When you are passing or being passed by colors that are being presented, paraded, or displayed, salute when the colors are six paces from you.

Hold the salute until the colors are six paces beyond you. The Pledge of Allegiance is not recited in military formations or in military ceremonies. At other functions where the Pledge of Allegiance is recited, a soldier in uniform silently stands at attention facing the flag and renders the hand salute if outdoors. Indoors a soldier in uniform silently stands at attention facing the flag. Where other participants are primarily civilians or in civilian attire, soldiers in uniform indoors may recite the pledge if they desire.

A soldier in civilian clothing recites the pledge while standing at attention, facing the flag with the right hand over the heart. Male soldiers should remove headgear with their right hand and hold it over the left shoulder so that the right hand is over the heart.

Tradition is a customary pattern of thought, action, or behavior help by an identifiable group of people. It is information, beliefs, and customs handed down by word of mouth or by example from one generation to another without written instruction. Our military traditions are really the "Army Way" of doing and thinking. An interesting thing about traditions is that many of our Army traditions started out as something quite different from what they are now.

Military tradition is an interesting and often amusing subject. It gives a soldier a feeling of pride to understand just why we do things the way we do. Traditions are expressed in the things we do, the uniform we wear, and the things we say. Many of the words we use in the Army are unique and have been added to our vocabulary from different parts of the world and at different times in history. Army traditions are the things that everyone in the Army does, everywhere. Unit traditions are the unique things that you do in your unit that other units may or may not do.

Some unit traditions are- Ceremonial duties. The green berets of the Army's Special Forces. Airborne units' maroon beret. Cavalry units' spurs and hats. Special designations authorized unit nicknames such as Cottonbalers, the 7th Infantry Regiment.

Distinctive items of clothing worn in your unit such as headgear, belt buckles, and tankers' boots. Unit mottoes such as "Victory! The soldier that utters that sound understands his task and will not quit until it is completed.

That sound means soldiers are ready and willing to accomplish the mission at hand. The music you hear at various hours of the day for example, "Reveille," "Retreat," and "Taps" or during ceremonies funerals, change of command, etc.

Military buglers have been communicating with soldiers for centuries. Bugle calls told troops when to go to bed, when to wake up, when to eat, when to attack, and when to retreat. There were stable calls, water calls, drill calls, sick calls, and church calls on Sunday. The Twilight Tattoo is a time honored military tradition that dates back to the British Army years ago when bugle calls were designed to notify the troops to return to the barracks from the local towns. The familiar tune of "Tattoo" signaled tavern owners to "doe den tap toe" or "turn off the taps.

Bugles were first used for signaling in America by the British army during the Revolutionary War. The sound of the bugle made it possible to convey commands over a great distance and could usually be heard above the roar of battle.

Right up to the beginning of the First World War, bugles were important tools in the control of units. Bugler from the Army Band As weapons became more lethal, with longer ranges, and required greater dispersal of units, bugles lost effectiveness in controlling units. But the Army still retains bugles and the music with which they communicate to soldiers is another reminder of our heritage. With every note of Reveille or Retreat we call to mind our common bond with soldiers of the Continental Army and the sacrifices soldiers have made ever since.

You can hear the bugle calls still used today on the Army Homepage at www.


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Customs, Courtesies, and Traditions The Army is an organization that instills pride in its members because of its history, mission, capabilities, and the respect it has earned in the service of the Nation. A reflection of that pride is visible in the customs, courtesies, and traditions the Army holds.

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CHAPTER 5: MILITARY CUSTOMS & COURTESIES. GENERAL. Military courtesy is simply the display of good manners and politeness in dealing with other people. Military courtesy conveys respect from both subordinate and senior to each other. HISTORY OF THE MILITARY SALUTE. Men of arms have used some form of the military salute as .

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CHAPTER 9 CUSTOMS AND COURTESIES The military services have a long history. Many traditions have been established as a result of this long history. Start studying Military Customs, Courtesies, and Traditions. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

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What are the courtesies rendered by individuals during Reveille if they are in uniform and not in formation either with or without headgear? At the first note of music, face flag and render hand salute (if flag is not in view, face direction of music). History shows that a lack of military customs and courtesies has a direct relationship with a decrease in esprit de corps, morale, discipline, and, .