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Academic CV: Example, Template & Writing Guide [with 20+ Expert Tips]

Getting You Through Graduate School, The Job Market and Tenure…

❶I unfortunately cannot respond to all queries at this point in time as volume exceeds my ability to keep up. However, I am continuing with the research until I leave and until my advisor finds another student to take my place.

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Tailor your academic CV for every application. Analyse the job description and specification, if available. Your CV needs to present strong evidence that you fulfil the job requirements Highlight your academic achievements and research interests. Find out as much as you can about the research area you are applying to, so you understand how your expertise complements theirs and can judge their familiarity with technical language of your research area Keep jargon to a minimum and write with clarity.

Spell out your qualifications, research, publications and any other relevant information. Describe your contribution to publications, particularly high impact publications. See the section on writing a statement of research interest. Don't be modest Publications: Include journal articles, books or chapters of books, reports and patents Research experience: Focus on higher education onwards.

Include awards and scholarships. Include the name of your doctoral supervisor and funding body, if appropriate Funding: Include the amount of money allocated, where useful Teaching experience: Highlight any positions of responsibility, event and course organisation, committee membership, etc, especially if administration features in the job description.

Ask for permission first Outside interests are unlikely to be relevant. Alan MacDonald , part-time doctoral researcher, arts and humanities and teacher Alison Parry , doctoral researcher, social sciences Mike Robinson , research staff, biological sciences Nabil Anwar , research staff, physics Rebecca King , research staff, arts and humanities Susan Weaver , research staff, social sciences.

Secondly, the best test of whether it's scannable is — drum roll, please — whether someone can scan it. So, give a hard copy of your CV to a willing friend, ideally someone who owes you a favour but doesn't know your career history inside out. Put a stopwatch on them for 90 seconds and ask them to read through the CV. What did they pick up in that time? What didn't stand out? Did they identify the achievements you most want the selection committee to notice?

This is part of the logic of scanning. Someone reading fast will turn the page and jump straight to the next heading, which means that whatever content has been 'held over' from the previous page could well go entirely unread. Break up sections by using subheadings, e.

I never thought to have to negotiate this, but, recently, a surprising number of early career academics have tried to argue this point with me. Let me therefore say very clearly: CV writing is not about what's logical or preferable to you; it's about anticipating your selectors' needs and trying to make their lives as easy as possible. If that argument doesn't convince you, here's another angle. Remember that I'm going to be skimming your CV, not reading it in detail. If I cast a quick glance over your publications and see at the top of the list a paper dated , then I may well conclude that you haven't published anything since and decide not to waste more time on reading this section of your CV.

In many cases, this is simply a question of structure. If you're applying for a teaching role at a less research-intensive university, then do I really want to wade through seven or eight pages of information about your research experience before I get to a meagre section on your teaching?

Bring the teaching section forward and expand it. If you've taught modules or topics relevant to the new post, then say so. If they want somebody with experience of supervising research students, then be sure that I can read about your experience of supervising research students without the need to pause, ponder, or decrypt.

Avoid like the plague all institution-specific arcana. My own university has more than its fair share of authentic and faux medieval terminology that is utterly opaque to outsiders and to many insiders , eg Tripos, Part II, prelims, JRF, DoS.

This is by no means an exclusively Cambridge phenomenon. You must be ruthless in purging your CV of language that doesn't make sense to readers outside your current institution because you run the genuine risk of offending. You will look like a snob who can't be bothered to translate his or her experience into generally comprehensible language. Think undergraduate exams, third year, postdoctoral fellowship, and so on. And here's a related tip: Paper, module, unit, or course?

Tutorials, supervisions, office hours, or something else? Show that you have done your homework, because it says something about how seriously you want the job. To my mind, it's baffling to want to list all course codes and other administrative technicalities on your CV, but I see this done alarmingly often. Yes, I do want to know what you have taught, in what format, and to what learners. I'm also happy, in most cases, to know the exact titles of those courses or lectures.

This is administrative information — for internal use only. Unless you are an internal applicant, how does this kind of pedantry help the selectors decide to put you on their shortlist? Extraneous information on a CV may not be as heinous a mistake as incomprehensible information see number 5 , but it clutters up the skim-reading process, potentially confuses the reader, and does you no discernible favours.

Why it is that professional scholars who have to prepare references and bibliographies for publication can't put a list together for their CVs, using a consistent style and with proper attention to detail, is a perennial mystery to me. And, yes, it does matter. Is slapdash what you want me to think of you before I've even met you? I can recognise a CV when I see one, and I trust that others can, too.

Your heading should be your name. And don't be pretentious: Put your name as a header on every page after the first.

Put page numbers on every single page. This might seem a little too 'belt and braces' for some, but the rationale is sound.


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Academic CVs differ from the CVs typically used by non-academics in industry, because you need to present your research, various publications and awarded funding in addition to the various other items contained in a non-academic CV. 1. This guide provides advice and tips on how best to write a CV for the academic field.

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Academic CVs should only be used for academic applications and have a unique format. The key extra features compared to general CVs are more focus on: publications; your research activities; funding awarded. Although academic CVs are longer than other types of CVs, no more than four pages is often recommended.

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The following CV format will give you a sense of what you might include in your academic CV. When writing your own curriculum vitae, tailor your sections (and the order of those sections) to your field, and to the job that you want. An academic CV that speaks the language of academics, whether you are applying for an academic or non-academic position in the university sector, can help you present yourself in the best light possible.

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A curriculum vitae, or CV, includes more information than your typical resume, including details of your education and academic achievements, research, publications, awards, affiliations, and more. Review sample curriculum vitae, the difference between a CV and a resume, and tips and advice on how to write a CV. This packet deals with writing your ACADEMIC CV. For instructions on how to write an International CV, please see our “International CV Guide.” Resume vs. CV Many of the rules of writing a resume can also be applied to writing a CV. A CV is a longer and more detailed synopsis of your background and skills.